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The Bread and the Cup

Communion

 

This Sunday we invite you to come and look to Jesus. We will turn our eyes to the cross as we come to the Lord’s Table, and we will consider the power of the resurrection as we continue in our sermon series in 1 Corinthians 15.

As we come to the Lord’s Table, let us consider the symbols of the bread and the cup which Jesus presented to his disciples at the conclusion of the Passover meal. I encourage you to read through Luke 22:14-20 and meditate on Jesus’ teaching:

And when the hour came, he reclined at table, and the apostles with him. And he said to them, “I have earnestly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer. For I tell you I will not eat it until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God.” And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he said, “Take this, and divide it among yourselves. For I tell you that from now on I will not drink of the fruit of the vine until the kingdom of God comes.” And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood.

Jesus gives the bread and the cup for us to remember.

“Do this in remembrance of me.”

We come to the Lord’s table to remember what Jesus has done. We take in our hands and consume the symbols of broken bread and a poured out cup as vivid reminders of the physical reality of Christ’s torn flesh and spilled blood. We remember the bloody cost of the love which Christ has given to us.

Jesus’ body was given for you.

19 And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”

Jesus passes the broken bread to his disciples, giving them a broken bread as a symbol in anticipation of the death he was about to die. Broken bread is provided for them, as he is providing himself for them. Beaten, exposed, scourged, thorn-crowned, pierced, and impaled, Jesus was broken for you.

Jesus’ blood was poured out for you.

20 And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood.”

He bled in agonizing prayer in Gethsemane, then again as he was beaten with rods and scourged by Roman flogging. Then again, as thorns were pummeled into his scalp. He staggered to Golgotha, and bled again as nails tore through his hands and feet. Jesus’ blood was poured out for you.

Christ our Savior came to be broken, poured out, rejected, and crushed for us. Jesus received the imputation of man’s guilt, absorbing the full weight of creation’s curse, satisfying God’s righteous judgment, receiving the full penalty, even to death on the cross.

Therefore, because of the love of Christ, we have the joy of knowing the reality of Romans 8:1, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.”

May this truth sink deep into our hearts. And as we come face to face with the suffering of Christ in the symbols of the bread and the cup, may we rejoice in the good news of Christ’s finished work and the hope of all things made new!